• Nutrient Management

    Seeds Land Planting Nutrient Water Pest Harvest

    nutrient-management-imgKEY CHECK 5:
    Sufficient nutrients from tillering
    to early panicle initiation and
    flowering stages.

    Advantages

    • good crop growth;
    • transplant the right amount of seedlings; and
    • provide the right kind and amount of nutrients at the right time.

    Remember:

    • oversupply of nutrients results to increased susceptibility of the crop to pests, lodging, etc.
    • under supply and untimely application slows down the growth of seedlings, lower number of tillers, and lower grain weight.

    Nutrients from fertilizers must be used efficiently and effectively. Proper management of nutrients improves crop growth and yield.

    ASSESSMENT OF KEY CHECK

    There should be no nutrient deficiency and toxicity symptoms from tillering to early panicle initiation and flowering stages that may impair the growth, development and yield of rice.
    At flowering stage:

    • achieve at least 210 panicles/m2 in rainfed lowland
    • 300 panicles/m2 in irrigated lowland for transplanted rice
    • 270 panicles/m2 in rainfed lowland
    • 350 panicles/m2 in irrigated lowland for direct wet seeded rice.

    To asses panicle density:

    • randomly select 3 sampling sites in a diagonal line across the field (the sampling sites should be at least 1 m from the edge of the field)
    • count the number of panicles using a 1 m x 1 m quadrat
    • add the number of panicles and divide the total by 3 to get the average number of panicles/m2.

    RECOMMENDATIONS TO ACHIEVE KEY CHECK

    Know and manage the nutrient requirement of your crop based on the available information, nutrient assessment and decision-support tools.
    Manage the Nitrogen needs of your crop based on the leaf color chart (LCC).

      • If the LCC reading is below 4 for transplanted rice and below 3 for direct wet-seeded rice, apply N fertilizer (1.5 bags urea per hectare in the dry season and 1 bag urea per hectare in the wet season) from tillering to early flowering stages.
      • Minus-One Element Technique (MOET)–conduct the MOET test 30 days before transplanting or direct wet seeding and assess the nutrient status based on plant nutrient deficiency symptoms and growth response
      • Soil Test Kit (STK).
        Aside from nutrient deficiency, consider mineral toxicity in deciding on the nutrients to apply. You can use other soil fertility assessment methods in assessing the nutrient status of the soil.

    Table 2. Fertilizer Recommendation

    Soil Nutrient Status Wet Season Yield Target
    5 t/ha
    Dry Season Yield Target
    7 t/ha
    P and K are not deficient First application:
    3-3.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S
    First application:
    4-4.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S
    P and K are deficient For fine-textured soil:
    First application:
    3-3.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    0.5 bag 16-20-0 + 0.5 bag 0-0-60

    For medium-textured soil:
    First application:
    3.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S + 0.5 bag 16-20-0

    At EPI:
    0.5 bag 0-0-60

    For fine-textured soil:
    First application:
    4-4.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    1 bag 16-20-0 + 1 bag 0-0-60

    For medium-textured soil:
    First application:
    4.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    1 bag 16-20-0

    At EPI:
    1 bag 0-0-60

    Only P is deficient
    First application:
    3-3.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    0.5 16-20-0
    First application:
    4-4.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    1 bag 16-20-0
    Only K is deficient For fine-textured soil:
    First application:
    3-3.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    0.5 bag 0-0-60

    For medium-textured soil:
    First application:
    3.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    0.5 bag 0-0-60

    At EPI:
    0.5 bag 0-0-60

    For fine-textured soil:
    First application:
    4-4.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S +
    1 bag 0-0-60

    For medium-textured soil:
    First application:
    4.5 bags 14-14-14-14-12S + 0.5 bag 0-0-60

    At EPI:
    1 bag 0-0-60