Pest Management

Seeds Land Planting Nutrient Water Pest Harvest

 

 

 

 

 

crop-establishment-imgKEY CHECK 7:
NO SIGNIFICANT YIELD LOSS
DUE TO PESTS.

Knowing how the rice crop interacts with biotic factors and the agroecosystem, and correctly identifying pests and applying ecologically sound management strategies can help prevent significant yield loss. They can also promote high-quality grains.

 

ASSESSMENT OF KEY CHECK

No significant yield loss due to insect pests, diseases, weeds, rats, snails, and birds. Such loss occurs when one or more pests inflict damage.

Check Tables 1-3 for practical assessment of pest damages.

Table 1. Insect pest level associated with significant yield loss (for 120-day-maturing variety).

Growth stage Stem borer (SB) Rice black bug (RBB) Brown planthopper (BPH) / Whitebacked planthopper (WBPH) Rice bug (RB)
Nursery/ Seedbed > 5 egg masses/㎡ negligible negligible negligible
Early tillering >30% deadheart >10 nymphs or adults/ hill;
> 20% deadheart/ bugburn
>25 all stages of insects/hill negligible
Mid to max tillering/ Early panicle initiation (EPI) >1 egg mass/㎡ >20 nymphs or adults/ hill;
> 30% deadheart/ bugburn
>50 all stages of insects/hill negligible
Flowering >20% whitehead >20 nymphs or adults/ hill;
>20 whitehead
>50 all stages of insects/hill negligible
Milk >20% whitehead >20 nymphs or adults/ hill;
>20 whitehead
>100 all stages of insects/hill >5 nymphs and adults/㎡
Grainfilling >20% whitehead >20 nymphs or adults/ hill;
>20 whitehead
>100 all stages of insects/hill >10 nymphs and adults/㎡
Maturity >20% whitehead >20% whitehead >100 all stages of insects/hill tolerable

Insect pests are monitored in the early morning (5:00-7:00AM) or late afternoon(5:00PM). Other pests are usually monitored in the late afternoon.

Table 2. Disease level associated with significant yield loss (for 120-day- maturing variety).

Growth stage Rice blast (leaf, neck, panicle) Sheath blight (ShB) Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) Rice tungro disease (RTD)
Nursery/ Seedbed >20% of seedbed with leaf blast none to negligible negligible none
Early tillering >20% of field with RTD
Mid to max tillering/ Early panicle initiation (EPI) >30% of field with leaf blast >40% of field with ShB >30% of field with BLB and undeveloped spikelets >40% of field with RTD
Flowering >10% of field with neck blast >30% of field with BLB on flag leaf tolerable
Milk >10% of field with panicle blast >30% of field with BLB and undeveloped spikelets
Grainfilling >40% of field with ShB and >10% unfilled grains
Maturity

 

Table 3. Weed, rat, snail, and bird infestation level associated with significant yield loss.

Weeds Rats Snails Birds
Significant yield loss > 5% of the area has weed cover at 0-40 DAS (DWSR), or >10% at 15-40 DAT (TPR) > 5% of the area has damaged tillers from maximum tillering to maturity > 10% of the area has missing or snaildamaged hills at 14 DAT or DAS > 5% of the area has damaged panicles

 

RECOMMENDATIONS TO ACHIEVE KEY CHECK

1. Use varieties that are resistant to pests prevalent in the locality. This is the first line of defense against pests and is compatible with the biological control method.

Change or rotate varieties every 2-4 croppings.

2. Practice synchronous planting after a 30-day rest period (see Key Check 3).

3. Conduct regular field-monitoring from the early stage of crop growth onwards to identify potential pests at their initial stage of development. Preventive disease management options can be applied before it spreads and reaches intolerable levels. For insect pests, preventive management options such as use of resistant varieties and synchronous planting are preferred. Insecticide application is a corrective measure to be deployed selectively when needed.

4. Let the many beneficial organisms thrive in the rice ecosystem. Such organisms regulate pest populations. The indiscriminate use of pesticides reduces biodiversity and disrupts the natural balance of insect pests and beneficial organisms. Conserving these organisms is economical and permanent.

For example, long-horned grasshoppers feed on the egg masses of stemborers while spiders feed on the nymphs and adults of leaf and planthoppers.

Table 4. Management options for common rice pests

Pest/disease Management options
Insect pests and diseases Do not spray against defoliators within 30 DAT or 40 DAS.
Diagnose diseases correctly, and practice field sanitation and synchronous planting.
Weeds
  • Control weeds within 0-45 DAT/DAS.
  • Use high-quality seeds.
  • Practice field sanitation.
  • Practice proper land preparation and water management.
  • Do manual and mechanical weeding.
  • Use herbicides as the last option.
Rats Practice timely, integrated, and sustained communitywide control. Fill rat burrows with soil and water. Practice sanitation.
Golden Apple Snails
  • Keep field saturated up to 25 DAS or up to 15 DAT.
  • Construct small canals and place attractants to facilitate snail collection.
  • Place wire/ bamboo screen at water in/outlets to regulate snail entry.
Birds Scaring them away is the most practical approach to managing birds.

 

MATERIALS

Handouts

Sheath Rot

Sheath Rot

bacterial-leaf-blight

Bacterial Leaf Blight

pamamahala-ng-sheath-blight-at-rice-blast

Pamamahala ng sheath blight at rice blast

pamamahala-ng-armyworm-at-planthopper

Pamamahala ng armyworm at planthopper

 

Learning Modules

pest-management

Pest Management

Diseases of rice and their management

Diseases of rice and their management

golden-apple-snail management

Golden Apple Snail management

 

Audio Clips

bio-pesticides-pwede-rin-sa-palayn

Bio pesticides pwede rin sa palay

palayaralan-integrated-pest-management

Palayaralan integrated pest management

alin-ang-mga-kaibigan-at-kaaway-na-insekto

Alin ang mga kaibigan at kaaway na insekto

rice-black-bug-o-rbb

Rice Black Bug o RBB

 

Technology Videos

Key check 7 Pamamahala ng Peste

Key check 7: Hindi bumaba ang ani dahil sa mga peste

Ecological engineering

Ecological engineering